Podcast Episodes

Vets Who Code We've brought on Jerome Hardaway, founder of Vets Who Code and Jacob Oakley, a successful graduate of the program, to talk to us about how they are helping the men and women who served in the US Military.

Improving Your Technical Writing There is a surprising amount of writing required to be a successful developer. Whether you have to write technical specifications, document an existing system, or even write tutorials for open source software, your technical writing skills will not only determine the quality of your work, but may even be the deciding factor in the success of your entire team.

Top 5 LinkedIn Mistakes with Amber Beam You make one little change on your LinkedIn profile and get flooded with recruiter emails. We've all been there. When you're looking for a job this is great but it can get annoying fast. Even worse is when you are looking but get all the wrong types of offers or get recruiters contacting you about jobs you don't want or aren't qualified to do. Most of the time this can be alleviated with some simple updates to your profile.

Put Yourself Out There It's pretty common in technology-related professions to be shy. Lots of people that get into this profession do so under the mistaken impression that they won't have to deal with people as frequently. That may have worked at one point, but the average software project is so complicated these days that you can no longer count on being the only person you are around.

Bad Reasons For Microservices Microservices are the cool, new way to build large software systems. The hype is everywhere, from the tech press to the hipster dude in the next cubicle. If you are building applications, you've probably felt at least some pressure to build them as microservices. However, if you've been in tech for very long, you've also seen a lot of fads come and go. You're probably wondering if you are really choosing microservices for good reasons.

Lunch and Learn Some of the best things we learn are not in a classroom but just sitting around chatting with fellow developers. Dev chats or lunch an learns somewhat formalize this process. They allow for things such as knowledge transfers from senior developers who have been working in a codebase for years as well as providing an opportunity for younger developers to show off new skills and technologies.

Integration Considerations As a professional developer, you're eventually going to have to work with a third party service. Other people's systems can introduce very interesting experiences, especially as your interaction with those systems matures. Not only are third-party systems opaque, usually poorly documented, and often subject to change on short notice, but they can also play havoc with your own release cycle. In this episode we'll talk about some practices for working with third party APIs without the constant risk of nasty surprises.

Developer, You Played Yourself Developers are supposed to be smart people. However, sometimes we do things that seem right in the moment, only to have them blow up in our faces later. This is especially true when it comes to career decisions and office politics. Basically, any situation where you need to act in a way that protects your own personal power is ripe for disaster when you don't think before acting.

Dependency Injection Dependency injection removes the need to create instances of services in your code. Instead of having a module of code call the other modules it may need to function Dependency Injection passes those into it from the original caller. This is usually a framework or other higher level code sitting on top of the custom code you write for controlling the flow of your application. In this episode we'll be talking about how dependency injection works, it's various parts, the different ways it's implemented, and finish up discussing some advantages and disadvantages.

The Cost of Your Commute Most of us have commutes. Whether it is every day, just once a week, or even just on occasion, most of us will have to leave the house on a somewhat regular interval to travel to work. Most development work can be done remotely. Unfortunately many times it is done in an office setting. This practice imposes costs on the developer, their team, and society that are probably not being fully considered. In this episode we are going to talk about some of these and how avoiding or modifying the commute might make a lot more sense.